Community of One - Sebastian Steed
(Artist)

Events

SEE 'MAKEOVER' GALLERY FOR PREVIEW OF MY UPCOMING EXHIBITION

13th Sept - 13th Oct, 2019

Exhibition - Makeover for the Disposable and Discarded

13/09/19 - 13/10/19

The Gallery, Main St, Ellenbrook

+ Event Details

13th Sept - 13th Oct, 2019

Exhibition - Makeover for the Disposable and Discarded

Come and experience a visual feast of Sebastian Steed's work which transforms  what we might consider to be disposable and discarded into a gleeful riot of colour and designs. This will be Sebastian Steed's (AKA Community of One) first major exhibition and so is an unmissable  opportunity to see important work by this emerging artist. 

13/09/19 - 13/10/19

The Gallery, Main St, Ellenbrook

18th Dec '19 - 29th Jan '20

Exhibition - Ootong & Lincoln Cafe

18/12/19 - 29/01/20

Ootong & Lincoln Cafe, South Terrace, Fremantle

+ Event Details

18th Dec '19 - 29th Jan '20

Exhibition - Ootong & Lincoln Cafe

A stunning selection of Seb's work from the Community of One Studio will be on display and available to buy on the art wall of Ootong & Lincoln Cafe in Fremantle. Enjoy a drink and something to eat at this trendy cafe near South Beach whilst being visually stimulated by the latest work from Seb's Community of One.

18/12/19 - 29/01/20

Ootong & Lincoln Cafe, South Terrace, Fremantle

My Art Rationale

Aesthetic Treatment (public, media, consumerism) and my art:

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The vast majority of what appears in public  goes through an aesthetic process or has an aesthetic treatment applied to it. Even media reports on tragic events are subject to aesthetic considerations (in other words, even death requires aesthetic applications). My art chooses many objects and images that appear in everyday life which don't normally receive an aesthetic treatment but undergo one from me because they are deserving of the aesthetic techniques available. Otherwise, these objects would be forgotten and, as it were, die due to being unrecorded (something we would not want to happen to ourselves). In this world of elevated appearances, objects and scenes that I draw or photograph such as a crushed can, a pair of scissors, the handle of sunglasses or some detail of suburban life are presented to the viewer as outstanding visions of complexity and assertive boldness. They are promoted to a kind of celebrity status which is how one achieves long lasting recognition and a powerful presence in a society dominated by televisual entertainment.

Distortion and Disruption

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Disrupting or distorting an image doesn't necessarily equate to disrespecting or despising it. It can, in fact, be quite the opposite, it can be an appraisal or an attempt to reveal a truth/truths regarding the chosen image. Adding one's own intervention or interruption can be a liberating act not only for the image but for the artist and viewer in that the pressure to consent to the original or intended meaning is challenged and diverted into other possibilities of meaning. For example, if an artist selects the emblem of McDonald's and turns it upside down, that act alone is inviting the viewer to revise what they associate with that image and what it suggests in a different orientation. It is my responsibility, I believe, as an artist to visually prompt questions and critical views of the consent we give to  the status of everyday visual encounters. The manipulation of us as consumers in the aesthetic treatments of what we consume needs to be disrupted and distorted in order to inform and empower us in the way we interpret the visual information that intends to influence our choices, thoughts and world view. What happens when the 'normal' is transformed into something extraordinary and new - something 'mind-altering'?

Repetition and Space

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If art is to be competitive then it should strive to take up as much space as possible. Advertising knows that its success depends greatly on how much space it can occupy (and time!). However, a competitive visual artist can only effectively compete in terms of space rather than time. Advertising relies on repetition in order to occupy as much space as possible. Not only on the number of advertisements to promote a product but also the amount of a product on shop shelves and floors. Recently, I saw a wall of packs of toilet paper (seven packs high and four deep) at the entrance to a supermarket. I felt compelled to take a photo of it as it was so imposing and impressive. Likewise, I think artists should recognise and implement the significance of repetition - whether that be using multiple copies or versions to create 'one' piece or accepting the fact that many people only know the work of an artist from reproductions, photographs, etc. Repetition in art challenges the concept of an 'original' and it is one that artists must address (or at least be conscious of) as we live in a world that is made up of replications and copies. We may not want art to be mass manufactured but how does it then survive in societies in which people expect to acquire their own 'copy' of something they treasure. In the use of repetition and space, I think an artist should challenge the norms of capitalism by employing those elements of its own effectiveness in domination.